An Unusual Sculpture: Sibelius Monument in Helsinki

O ne of the sites in Helsinki at which I wanted to visit on my morning walk from the Hilton Helsinki Kalastajatorppa was the Sibelius Monument in Helsinki — and it was conveniently on my way. I walked southeast on Paciuksenkatu — and at the turn where the thoroughfare becomes Linnankoskenkatu, I turned right onto a quiet street named Merikannontie, which was adjacent to one of the many inlets of the Gulf of Finland.

An Unusual Sculpture: Sibelius Monument in Helsinki

I approached Sibeliuksen puisto — which is Sibelius Park in English — where the unusual sculpture is located…

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…and there it was: 24 metric tons of welded steel, simulating 600 organ pipes in honor of Jean Sibelius, who was a composer and violinist.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Sibelius was born on Friday, December 8, 1865 in what was then known as the Grand Duchy of Finland.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Like the Hilton Helsinki Kalastajatorppa hotel property, the sculpture is situated on a base of solid rock.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

On the side of the sculpture is a bust of Sibelius.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Sibelius died on Friday, September 20, 1957…

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…and in his honor, the sculpture and bust were created by Eila Hiltunen, who was born in Russia but moved to Finland.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is a closer look at the bust of the man who was born with the name Johan Julius Christian Sibelius.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I was born and raised in New York and yet I did not know this bit of trivia: a smaller version of the Sibelius Monument is located on the grounds of the headquarters of the United Nations in New York; and it was also created by Eila Hiltunen, who died in Helsinki on Monday, November 10, 2003.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The next few photographs capture the intricate work by the sculptor.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This view is from underneath the sculpture towards the bust of Jean Sibelius.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

One can almost hear the organ music playing.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Let the inner child in you come out and try your hand at “composing music” while underneath the sculpture by using your voice to create noise.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is one of the bases supporting the sculpture.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Looking southwest in the distance is the street named Merikannontie, with one of the many inlets of the Gulf of Finland just beyond it – and with the light blanket of snow, creating idyllic scenery.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is the signature of Eila Hiltunen, who started working on the sculpture in 1961 and finished it prior to its unveiling on Thursday, September 7, 1967.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Sibelius Monument is one of the most popular sculptures — as well as one of the best known tourist attractions — in Helsinki. A busload of tourists from China marveled at the sculpture while I was there, taking many photographs and simply having fun before departing on the bus to the next attraction.

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Snow was forming on the insides of the “pipes”…

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…as well as gathering at the ridges at the bottom of each “pipe.”

Sibelius Monument Helsinki

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The snow was still falling in the cold air — albeit lightly — as seen in the photograph above.

Summary

There is no charge to visit the sculpture or the beautiful park itself; and you can stay as long — or as briefly — as you like…

…and it was time for me to walk on to my next stop…

All photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

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