Delta Flight Museum: Photographs Inside Hangar 1 of the Official Venue of the 2015 Freddie Awards

efore we get to Hangar 1 — which is the smaller of the two historic hangars which house the Delta Flight Museum — I still have a few exhibits to show to you in Hangar 2.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

In front of The Spirit of Delta Boeing 767-232 aircraft and to the right is a screen onto which images and films can be projected. There are two flaws: daylight — which cannot be easily blocked because of all of the windows on the doors to Hangar 2 — tends to fade what is projected onto the screen and renders it difficult to see; and the screen may be too small if anyone is attempting to view it from the doors of the hangar. There should be no daylight issues for the Freddie Awards in 2015 if they decide to use the screen, as the sun sets in the west and the windows of the doors of Hangar 2 face east; and the Freddie Awards occurs in the evening hours.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

There is no mistaking from what aircraft this tail comes, as it is a McDonnell Douglas DC-9.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

If you visit the cockpit of the Convair 880 aircraft, do not expect a reporter to be interviewing an employee of Delta Air Lines — that is not part of the permanent exhibit; and the people in the photograph are indeed real.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

You cannot actually enter the cockpit of the Convair 880 aircraft; but you can still view it up close — and there is even a touch-screen monitor where you can learn more information about this particular model of airplane.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The first Convair 880 aircraft was flown as part of the fleet of Delta Air Lines when it entered service in 1960 — breaking speed records along the way.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

In addition to the exhibits on baggage carts — as shown by one of the photographs in this article — there are also permanent exhibits underneath the catwalk between the Boeing 737-200 flight simulator and the Lockheed L-1011-1 prototype.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

If you are an airline enthusiast — or geek, which is the descriptor preferred by Jeanne Marie Hoffman of Le Chic Geek — then be prepared to literally spend hours in the Delta Flight Museum…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…as there are simply too many items of Delta Air Lines memorabilia to list here — let alone show photographs…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…and that is not even including all of the exhibits aboard The Spirit of Delta aircraft, which is shown in the above photograph; as well as the next two photographs.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

By the way, the people in the above photograph are not real and are part of the permanent exhibit. I just thought I should let you know that.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

We are finally done with Hangar 2 — at least without detailing all of the items on display in the exhibits…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…so let us go through this cool tunnel — which replaced a dull nondescript hallway in the former Delta Heritage Museum — to get from Hangar 2 to Hangar 1, which contains models of older aircraft.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Although I may joke about the people in the above photograph not being real, it appears that this exhibit of a restored 1931 Travel Air 6B Sedan aircraft — whose nickname is the “Gull Wing” — can no longer be accessed by real people. Thanks to the late Joe Maknauskas — who was the aircraft and facility manager of the former Delta Heritage Museum — I was able to hop in and sit down in the rear of the aircraft. You can view photographs of the interior of the aircraft — as well as read a dedication to Joe, who is sorely missed — in this article written by me on Sunday, October 21, 2012, which is the day Joe died.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

A Northeast Airlines Stinson SR-8E Reliant hangs from the ceiling in Hangar 1. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Northeast Airlines Stinson SR-8E Reliant aircraft — which was restored in 2005 — hangs around from the ceiling in Hangar 1.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Huff. Daland Dusters Incorporated — founded in Macon, Georgia — was a crop-dusting operation which formed the roots for Delta Air Lines…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…and it was the first commercial agricultural flying company in existence. Please click here for more information about the history of Delta Air Lines; and click here for a .pdf file of all of the airlines which eventually became a part of Delta Air Lines over the years.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Historic replicas and restorations of airplanes abound in Hangar 1 — including what is arguably the most prized aircraft of the Delta Flight Museum itself — the meticulously restored 1940 Delta Douglas DC-3 aircraft. It is affectionately known as Ship 41; and it is the first DC-3 aircraft of Delta Air Lines to carry passengers.

I have much better photographs of this 1940 Delta Douglas DC-3 aircraft, which I may post in a future article dedicated to it. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

I have much better photographs of this 1940 Delta Douglas DC-3 aircraft, which I may post in a future article dedicated to it. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

I have been in Ship 41 multiple times — and you can go on it too, as a tour of the interior of Ship 41 occurs on the second Tuesday of each month. This aircraft was Joe’s baby, as he was so proud of it.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

I may dedicate an article in the future to this particular historic aircraft, as I have photographs of both the interior and exterior. It is simply immaculate; and Joe helped to keep it that way, as you can see in the photographs included in this aforementioned article dedicated to him.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

This Northwest Airways Waco 125 aircraft is the only one of its kind remaining in existence. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

This Northwest Airways Waco 125 aircraft — which hangs from the ceiling in a dedicated theater within the Delta Flight Museum — is the only one of its kind remaining in existence.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Let us move on from the airplanes; but watch yourself…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…there is an exhibit of photographs of employees of Delta Air Lines who earned their place in the prestigious Chairman’s Club…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…and a replica of the façade of the old airport terminal in Monroe, Louisiana.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

If you not had enough of all of the exhibits located in Hangar 2, do not be concerned…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…as there are plenty more exhibits in Hangar 1, as seen in the above photograph.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Finally, there is the museum store itself.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

This angle is facing the exit to the vestibule near the main entrance to the Delta Flight Museum. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

While you may not take any of the artifacts and items on display in the Delta Flight Museum home with you to keep…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

This angle is facing the exit to Hangar 2 of the Delta Flight Museum. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…you can purchase such memorabilia as cutlery with the Delta Air Lines logo on it, which was used in the premium class cabins during flights; clothing; bags; and model airplanes to name a few items — usually at reasonable prices.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Some items sold in the museum store are considered limited edition collectibles. You can shop for some items via the Internet from the comfort of your own home.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Although there are still more items and exhibits on display, I have showed you the main ones. If you want to see more of the Delta Flight Museum than I have already posted in past articles, you will have to visit it for yourself.

One last thing: I personally have organized events multiple times at the former Delta Heritage Museum; and the staff has always been accommodating. Through Sodexo, Delta Air Lines has a catering division where you can choose from all different types of meal plans and menu items — and I have enjoyed the food as well as my guests. Click here for the menu. They also supply some audio and video equipment, platforms, podiums — pretty much whatever you need for a successful event. I highly recommend using the Delta Flight Museum for a future event — and no, I am not being compensated for my recommendation in any way whatsoever, as it is simply based on personal experience.

In fact — if you are attending the Freddie Awards on Thursday, April 30, 2015, you will find out for yourself just how good is the food and service…

…and finally, good luck to all of the frequent travel loyalty programs in contention to win awards!


Recent Articles Pertaining to the Delta Flight Museum and the Freddie Awards for 2015

 

All photographs ©2014 by Brian Cohen.


Delta Flight Museum
1060 Delta Boulevard
Building B, Department 914
Atlanta, Georgia  30354-1989

E-mail: museum.delta@delta.com

Telephone: 404-715-7886
Fax: 404-715-2037

Museum and Store Hours

Museum Admissions

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday: 10:00 in the morning – 4:30 in the afternoon
Wednesday: The Delta Flight Museum is closed to visitors
Sunday: Noon – 4:30 in the afternoon

Delta Flight Museum Store

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday: 9:00 in the morning – 5:00 in the afternoon
Wednesday: 10:00 in the morning – 2:00 in the afternoon
Saturday: 10:00 in the morning – 5:00 in the afternoon
Sunday: Noon – 5:00 in the afternoon

*The Delta Flight Museum Store can also be open during private events.

Events — for Delta and external events

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday: 7:00 – 9:30 in the morning and 4:30 in the afternoon through midnight
Wednesday: 7:00 in the morning through midnight, as the Delta Flight Museum is closed to visitors
Sunday: 7:00 – 11:30 in the morning and 4:30 in the afternoon through midnight

The Theater and TriStar Conference Room are available for rental at times other than those listed above.

Admission

All admission prices include tax.

$12.50 Adults 18 through 64 years of age
$10.00 Senior citizens 65 years of age and older
$7.00 Children 5 through 17 years of age
Free of Charge Children 4 years of age and younger

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