Lake Louise From a Slightly Different Perspective

W hen you think of Lake Louise at Banff National Park in Canada, the following view is probably the first image which comes to your mind:

Lake Louise

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Lake Louise From a Slightly Different Perspective

Sure — I have plenty of photographs like the one shown above; and I intend to share some of them with you in a future article pertaining to Lake Louise…

…but in addition to a trail which will take you to the opposite end of Lake Louise — of which I also have photographs to share in a future article — do not miss taking a short hike up the Fairview Lookout trail, which will reward you with a view of Lake Louise from 100 meters in altitude.

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The trail of approximately one kilometer starts near the boathouse area of Lake Louise and will ascend for approximately half of a kilometer until a junction in the trail appears. Follow the signs; keep to the right; and continue to hike until you reach the viewing platform.

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

On the day I visited, there was snow on the ground — as much as one foot deep in some places. The deep snow was not the problem — rather, it was the icy areas of the trail which were extremely slippery and wet with melting snow and caused ascension along the steeper grades of this trail to be significantly more difficult…

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…but once I arrived at the observation platform at the end of the trail, I saw the view shown in the above photograph…

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…and I decided that even with the snow and ice, hiking that trail was well worth the views to which I was treated.

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The view was literally breathtaking.

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

To exacerbate the situation of deep snow and slippery ice on the trail, nothing but trees will stop one from falling down the steep side of the mountain should one slip the wrong way.

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

On the other side of the lake is a flat trail which runs alongside the lake.

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I would have rather stayed at the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise hotel rather than at the Delta Hotels Banff Royal Canadian Lodge at which I stayed.

Lake Louise from above

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Fortunately, I was able to maneuver the slippery trail back down to near the boathouse of Lake Louise.

Summary

I did not take the Lake Agnes Teahouse trail; but I understand that that trail can be a bit strenuous due to the significant gain of elevation over a short distance.

You should allow yourself a minimum of 45 minutes for the round trip of two kilometers; but if there is snow and ice on the trail, add at least another 30 minutes — and take your time and take it easy.

Other than admission into Banff National Park — which has been suspended for 2017 while Canada celebrates 150 years as a confederation — there is no admission fee to visit; and you can stay as long as you like.

All photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

4 thoughts on “Lake Louise From a Slightly Different Perspective”

  1. Kami says:

    It’s not accurate to say that there is no entry fee. You need to pay to get into the national park that Lake Louise is located in. However, for the 150 year celebration of Canada, national parks are free this year, but you need to apply in advance, online, for your free pass. Also, it would be prudent to mention that this lake is extremely busy and parking is crazy so, out of respect for the beautiful environment there, and for the staff and locals, please take a shuttle whenever possible.

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      You are correct, Kami.

      I already addressed the suspension of the fee to enter national parks in Canada in 2017 in this article…

      http://thegate.boardingarea.com/free-entry-into-national-parks-in-canada-all-year-long/

      …which began the series of articles of my visit; so I edited the last paragraph of this article — and plan to do so with other articles pertaining to places located within the national parks of Canada.

      As for taking the shuttle to Lake Louise, I did not have to do that as ample parking was available when I visited; but for anyone who does use the overflow parking lot off of Trans-Canada Highway 1, school buses and other vehicles are used as shuttle vehicles to transport visitors 10.1 kilometers each way to and from the lake itself. I would advise adding at least 45 minutes to the visit to Lake Louise to factor in the time of being shuttled between the lake and the overflow parking lot.

      Thank you, Kami.

  2. Ches says:

    I would just like to respectfully mention that there is no need to apply for the free pass for the national park. We drove in to the park and got our pass at the gate with no delay whatsoever.

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      I had a similar experience to you, Ches:

      “I recently visited Banff National Park in Alberta; and I obtained my Discovery Pass at the entrance on the Trans Canada Highway. There was no line; the interaction only took minutes; I was given a variety of printed materials which included a map; and the person in the booth was friendly and welcoming. The process could not have been easier for me.”

      http://thegate.boardingarea.com/free-entry-into-national-parks-in-canada-all-year-long/

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