Standing on Four States at Four Corners Monument

Heading over to the Four Corners Monument and standing on four states at one time is one of those goofy things that I have wanted to do; but because it is located in such a remote area, I never had the chance to do so — and I have already been to all 50 states for years now.

Standing on Four States at Four Corners Monument

I was not expecting to pass the Four Corners monument; but weather conditions on the route with which I was originally going to take convinced me to change my loose plans — and that is when the opportunity presented itself to me.

After staying overnight in Alamosa — which is located in central southern Colorado — I drove the 231 miles of United States Highway 160 west to a place where little else exists.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Only one road intersects with United States Highway 160 during its short length of 0.9 miles in New Mexico between Colorado and Arizona — and that is New Mexico State Highway 597, which is basically the entrance of Four Corners National Monument.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Four Corners Monument is operated by Navaho Nation Parks and Recreation and not by the National Park Service of the United States; so any park passes — such as the Lifetime Senior Pass — is not valid here.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

General admission to enter the Four Corners Monument area is five dollars per person. You can pay at this booth upon entering; or you can pay the fee in advance. General admission passes are valid for four consecutive days of entry into the park — starting on your selected arrival date.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is the view from the entrance of Four Corners Monument, which is the only place in the United States where four states intersect at one point: Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This plaque explains how the Four Corners Monument was originally established in 1868. The original marker erected in 1912 was a simple cement pad, but has since been redone in 1992 in granite and brass, with the actual marker created as a disc from aluminum and bronze.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

There is a limit of three photographs at the point where the four states — New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado — meet…

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…but on the day which I visited, no more than 15 visitors in total were at the Four Corners Monument; so the limit was not enforced.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Each person does something a little bit differently to ensure that he or she is on four states at the same time. This person put each arm and each leg in each state while lying down on the ground.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The center disc is where the corners of each of the four states meet.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This photograph shows the aluminum and bronze disc designating the exact point of where the corners of the four states meet.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I simply stood on all four states at the same time — nothing fancy.

New Mexico

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is the flag of the state of New Mexico.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

A view of the New Mexico side.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The great seal of New Mexico is displayed.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Engraved in this block is information about the surveying of New Mexico.

Arizona

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is the flag of the state of Arizona.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

A view of the Arizona side.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The great seal of Arizona is displayed.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Engraved in this block is information about the surveying of Arizona.

Utah

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is the flag of the state of Utah.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

A view of the Utah side.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The great seal of Utah is displayed.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Engraved in this block is information about the surveying of Utah.

Colorado

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is the flag of the state of Colorado.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

A view of the Colorado side.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The great seal of Colorado is displayed.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Engraved in this block is information about the surveying of Colorado.

Other

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is the flag of the Navaho Nation, which was adopted on Tuesday, May 21, 1968.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Not much exists outside of the Four Corners Monument — but the land is considered sacred by members of the Navajo Nation.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Plenty of seating is available — as well as platforms from which people can view where the corners of four states meet.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Many booths of vendors of the Navajo Nation were empty on the day when I arrived during the off season; but some were still occupied. Navajo vendors typically sell handmade jewelry, crafts and traditional Navajo foods nearby.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The main rest room area was closed due to construction.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

However, these portable toilets were not the temporary replacements. I believe that these are for the vendors and employees at Four Corners Monument.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Rather, these two structures are the temporary rest rooms.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

No running water is available at the Four Corners Monument — which is why hand sanitizers were available. Not all of them worked, however.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I was in disbelief when I read this sign. Why would anyone want to disperse cremation ash here…

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…or ride their motorcycles or skateboards on the monument plaza. Are people really that thoughtless?!?

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This sign alone would be enough to re-ignite the service animal and emotional support animal debate.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This is a trash can? Really?!?

Okay — in all fairness, I suppose that someone could confuse this receptacle with one designated for recyclable materials or other uses.

Four Corners Monument

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

One more person poses on the intersection of four state corners as I turn to leave.

Rock climbing is not permitted on Navajo Nation land. Please abide by the humble religious requests of the Navajo people and do not climb the monuments. “Navajo law will be strictly enforced on this issue,” according to the Parks Department Manager.

All areas on the Navajo Nation are closed to non-Navajos unless you have a valid pass or permit issued by the Navajo Parks and Recreation Department or other delegated tribal authority. Failure to have a permit is considered trespassing on a federal Indian reservation.

Summary

I personally am glad I visited the Four Corners Monument — especially as it was unexpectedly on my way west — but not everyone will feel that way.

The visitor center is open all year round and features a demonstration center with Navajo artisans. Picnic tables are available. Services and accommodations are very limited to small cafés, grocery stores and self-service gasoline stations within a radius of 30 miles.

You should have plenty of water, food, snacks, hand wipes and extra toiletries when visiting, as the area is very remote. No running water, no electricity, and no telephones are available. I could not even have a text sent from my mobile telephone at the time I visited and stood where the four state corners intersect.

Other that limited opportunities to learn about the Navajo Nation and its indigenous people, the only reason to visit here is to be in four states simultaneously — and achieving that distinction is not of interest to everyone. Even if it is of interest to you, consider visiting here only as part of visiting a region which has other natural parks and monuments; or if it happens to be on your way to somewhere else. Do not consider this site as a destination to which you should travel a long way.

Four Corners Monument
P.O. Box 861
Teec Nos Pos, Arizona 86514
1-928-206-2540
navajonationparks.org/nslim@navajonationparks.org — e-mail address of the manager of the park

Four Corners Monument is located at United States Highway 160 and New Mexico State Highway 597 approximately six miles north of Teec Nos Pos, Arizona. Information and permits can be obtained for San Juan River and Four Corners area.

The Navajo Nation honors Daylight Savings Time; and the hours of operation are 8:00 in the morning through 4:45 in the afternoon, seven days per week. Four Corners monument is closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.

General Admission Passes are valid for 4 consecutive days of entry into the park starting on your selected arrival date.

General admission passes cost $5.00 per person; while commercial passes are based on seating capacity of the vehicle as follows:

  • $35.00 for 1-6 passengers — an additional $6.00 each
  • $100.00 for 7-15 passengers
  • $125.00 for 16-25 passengers
  • $300.00 for 26 or more passengers

All photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

3 thoughts on “Standing on Four States at Four Corners Monument”

  1. DaninMCI says:

    I’ve had some interest in visiting this spot for awhile but when i was driving through this area recently amd found out that it cost $5 to visit i skipped it. They would stand a better chance of getting more money from me if it was free and offered over priced souvenirs. I know this sounds cheap but it didnt cost me anything to “stand on a corner” in nearby Winslow Arizona and I even bought me wife a t-shirt there.

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      I completely agree with you, DaninMCI — similar to how I feel about fees for visas simply to enter a country, as I would rather spend that money on merchants who will pay part of their income to the government in taxes anyway:

      http://thegate.boardingarea.com/qatar-waives-visa-entry-requirements-effective-immediately-for-citizens-of-80-countries/

  2. Maureen says:

    $5.00 for a unique experience? Spend the money and skip a coffee or 30 seconds of junk food.
    Driving to New Orleans I was surprised and psyched when i drive over the 3 mile Lake Pontchatrain causeway. Then i heard there was a longer, 24 mile, drive but it was a $5.00 toll.
    Loved driving over the longest, over the water, continuous bridge and had my $5.00 out in case they didn’t take ezpass. Surprise! No toll. The toll is going into NOLA.

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