Visit the Birthplace of Abraham Lincoln

I f you ever find yourself driving on Interstate 65 in central Kentucky, you may want to visit the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln, who was the sixteenth president of the United States.

There are actually two sites you may visit — and both are located within 15 minutes of each other: the single room log cabin in which Abraham Lincoln was born at the site of Sinking Spring Farm; and the boyhood home at Knob Creek. Both sites are located on picturesque grounds with trees within a drive of 15 minutes off of the highway — and there is no fee or cost to you to visit either site.

For this mini trip report, you will see some photographs of the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park. Tomorrow, I will post photographs of the Abraham Lincoln Boyhood Home Unit at Knob Creek.

Enjoy!

All photographs ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park Sign

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

You might consider this building the “original” Lincoln Memorial. The log cabin in which Abraham Lincoln was born is located inside of the building. Phorograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

You might consider this building the “original” Lincoln Memorial. The log cabin in which Abraham Lincoln was born is located inside of the building. Phorograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

This is the log cabin in which Abraham Lincoln was born. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

This is the log cabin in which Abraham Lincoln was born. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The farm owned by the father of Abraham Lincoln was named Sinking Spring for a reason, as here is its namesake. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The farm owned by the father of Abraham Lincoln was named Sinking Spring for a reason, as here is its namesake. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The path to the left leads to where the Boundary Oak tree once stood in the woods; while the stairs with the stone entrance on the right leads down to Sinking Spring. Photographs ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The path to the left leads to where the Boundary Oak tree once stood in the woods; while the stairs with the stone entrance on the right leads down to Sinking Spring. Photographs ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

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