Answers to Past Articles — Part 3: McDonald’s, Lavatory Door Sign, Ice Cream, and Speed Limit Signs

In past articles in which your participation was not only requested but also helpful and humorous, I did not give the answers to questions which I have posed to you; so this article is the third of a series to do just that — along with links to the aforementioned articles…

Answers to Past Articles — Part 3: McDonald’s, Lavatory Door Sign, Ice Cream, and Speed Limit Signs

…and the links are embedded in the titles of each section as well as within the sections themselves; so please click on the links in each section to take you to the original article.

Also, a new feature has recently been added to this particular series of articles: the Favorite Answer will usually be the correct answer by a reader of The Gate — along with a Favorite Comment from the same article which I found to be funny or informative.

Was I Too Blinded By Hunger to Read This Sign Correctly?

Here is a riddle for you: when does being open 24 hours not mean being open for 24 hours?

McDonald’s restaurant Hinton

Photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Almost any type of food sounded good to me at approximately 11:45 in the evening as I was quite hungry after a full day exploring the Rocky Mountains at Jasper National Park in Canada; so when I saw a large sign that the dining room of a McDonald’s restaurant was open 24 hours, I figured that I would have had no problem ordering food.

Please read more about my experience in this article.

Favorite answer by Miles: “I read it the same way you do.”

Favorite comment by Thomas: “Well, it depends if each font size/colour is to be read together or as one sentence.

“It could be read as:

“[We have a] dining room & drive thru.
“[We are] open 24 hours (without specifying which part).
“Breakfast starts at 4am.

“But it is definitely misleading.”

Read the Fine Print — A Lesson Taught By the McDonald’s in Hinton

At the bottom of the aforementioned sign in fine print…

McDonald’s restaurant Hinton

Photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…is small print which comprised of the wordsMany restaurants in Canada open 24 hours. See mcdonalds.ca for participating locations. ©2014 McDonald’s

McDonald’s restaurant Hinton

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This particular McDonald’s restaurant in Hinton in Alberta is only open every day from 4:00 in the morning through 11:00 in the evening and not for 24 hours. If I wanted to patronize a McDonald’s restaurant which was open 24 hours per day, I would have had to drive to Edson, which is 91.1 kilometers further east on Trans-Canada Highway 16 towards Edmonton.

I was going to say that the location of a McDonald’s restaurant on Fourth Avenue in Edson is open 24 hours per day seven days per week — but as the hours are from midnight through 11:59 in the evening, does that mean that the restaurant closes for one minute every day?

I suppose I could have driven almost an hour to the Edson location to have had use of the dining room — how crazy an idea that would have been — but with my luck, I would show up one second after 11:59 in the evening to be told that the dining room was closed.

Favorite answer by Jeannine: “‘Is being open every day from 4:00 in the morning through 11:00 in the evening the metric version of being open 24 hours?’ — Brilliant. JS”

Favorite comment by Michael T: “They’re open 24 hours, but not in a row.”

What Two Errors Can You Find With This Lavatory Sign?

Someone was paid to create this sign. Someone was paid to proofread it. Someone was paid to approve it. Someone was paid to affix it to the lavatory doors…

Lavatory sign

Photograph ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

…and yet, I found at least two errors with this sign.

Favorite answer by LcSinTexas: “‘not is use’ and ‘takeoffand’. Looks like so many other occasions where people decide they are so smart they needn’t bother with spell check of either the human or machine kind.”

Favorite comment by derek: “Airline: Delta
“Errors:
“1. takeoffand is not a word. Probably meant “..takeoff and…”
“2. “Close door immediately when not is use”. Should be “in” not “is”.
“3. Man is attacking baby. That is a crime. Also slightly more common that a woman would change a baby.
“4. blue sticker around the occupied warning is crooked.
“5. mostly correct but door is in use when you are pooping. That is a time that the door should be closed, not only when it is not being used.”

What is Wrong With This Photograph? Part 13

ice cream

Photograph ©2019 by Brian Cohen.

As I was on the road and about to enjoy some of the best ice cream I have ever had — Bully’s premium strawberry ice cream, which is made with real strawberries — at Mississippi State University, whose mascot is a bulldog…

ice cream

Photograph ©2019 by Brian Cohen.

…and I immediately found at least two things which were incorrect, as shown in the photograph above — but as at least one reader of The Gate correctly pointed out, other errors were also prevalent.

Favorite answer by Matthew: “I love MLIK and MIIK!”

Favorite comment by Carol: “Mlik …srnlium( should be sodium?) benzoate.”

What is Wrong With This Photograph? Part 14

speed limit sign highway

Photograph ©2020 by Brian Cohen.

A regular lens — not a telephoto lens — was used to take the photograph shown above; so the two speed limit signs are actually aligned with each other on either side of the northbound direction of the highway, as no trick photography was used here…

…but the 65 mile-per-hour speed limit sign on the left is for motorists who are using the express lane behind the concrete barrier — whereas the 70-mile-per-hour speed limit sign on the right is for all other motorists who are not using the express lanes.

Favorite answer by George: “Presumably there is a roadway in the middle with a 65 mph speed limit? If that’s the case, there should be no yellow line on the left, as traffic is flowing in the same direction on both sides of it.

“There should, of course, be a 70 mph marker to the right of the 65 mph one as well, as those in the left lane may not see the 70.”

Favorite comment by Tj: “It’s obvious to me that if you are driving against traffic you are limited to drive only 65. If you are driving with traffic you can go 70. I drive with traffic most of the time because I can go faster.”

Summary

Answers to past articles in the What is Wrong With This Photograph? game — which have already been answered — include Answers to Past Articles — Part 1: Muffin Flavor, Beverage Machine, Pickle, Map, and Steak and Answers to Past Articles — Part 2: Airport, Lounge Sign, Fish Sandwich, Bed Bugs, and Airplanes

…and more answers to past articles will be forthcoming in future articles…

All photographs ©2017, ©2018, ©2019, and ©2020 by Brian Cohen.

2 thoughts on “Answers to Past Articles — Part 3: McDonald’s, Lavatory Door Sign, Ice Cream, and Speed Limit Signs”

  1. Barry Graham says:

    If I’m paying to use Express lanes I expect to be the one that can drive faster, not slower! That’s how it is here the DC area.

  2. Bob says:

    Wow! Would it have killed McD’s to be any more unclear? Though the fine print (looks small enough that it can’t be read from a moving car) does technically make it a legal avertissement. 😉

    Speaking of bilingual, when I first looked at that photo, what struck me as being wrong was the name. IIRC, Canada has a regulation for signage and marketing that disallows possessive apostrophe use in names. Maybe it varies by province? Time to visit the Great White North and get a double-double…I mean, do research…for the team: #TeamCruller 🙂

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