Instead of Blue Lagoon in Iceland, I Went to…

When I wanted to experience soaking in thermal waters in Iceland, I was not searching for a spa environment with towels and robes and drinks — nor was I looking to spend at least $59.00 for the privilege of doing so — which meant that the famed Blue Lagoon was out in terms of a destination for me. Even the Secret Lagoon — which is less expensive than the Blue Lagoon — did not fit the bill.

Instead of Blue Lagoon in Iceland, I Went to…

Hellulaug Spring Iceland

Photograph ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

Iceland is dotted with smaller thermal pools — many of them which are natural. One of those pools is called Hellulaug, at which I arrived on a cold, cloudy and windy day.

Hellulaug Spring Iceland

Photograph ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

You will need to hike down some rocks and an unpaved path to get to Hellulaug — but the very short hike is rather easy. Just take it slowly.

Hellulaug Spring Iceland

Photograph ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

Hellulaug is located at water level with Vatnsfjörður Fjord, at which you can admire the view while you take in a good long soak. Two people were in the pool; but as not many people currently know about Hellulaug, chances are good that you can have it all to yourself.

Hellulaug Spring Iceland

Photograph ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

Once in the pool of Hellulaug, you can relax in water which is naturally heated to approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Even though the ambient temperature of the air was cold enough in which I can see my breath, I was warm and comfortable once my body was submerged into the relaxing calm water.

Hellulaug Spring Iceland

Photograph ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

The pool is shallow enough in some parts where you can lay down — or you can float, if you prefer. This view was photographed while I was laying down in the pool. I was not fortunate enough on this particular day, but I understand that one can view many species of birds at this location.

Hellulaug Spring Iceland

Photograph ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

The only unnatural part of Hellulaug Spring is that the hot water passes through a pipe from a natural hot spring to the pool area — and because of this, the warmest water is located near the pipe. You can see it clearly in the photograph at the top of this article.

Hellulaug Spring Iceland

Photograph ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

Be careful entering in and leaving the pool, as the algae which covers the rocks in the water tends to lead to very slippery conditions. Bring a camera into the pool with you at your own risk; and be very slow, careful and deliberate so that you do not slip and fall.

Summary

Hellulaug is located in the Westfjords region of Iceland, so you will need a car to get to it — and a small parking lot is located above it, where you can park your car free of charge. Its official address is Vestfjarðarvegur 451 Patreksfjörður.

Mentioning that Hellulaug is open 24 hours per day may initially seem ridiculous; but if you are visiting sometime in the middle of the night during the months flanking the summer solstice, the sun will be out — albeit low on the horizon — which means potentially interesting lighting for your photographs and even less of a chance of other visitors joining you.

There are no facilities and no admission fee to enter and enjoy Hellulaug, where you can stay as long as you like. I wore my bathing suit underneath my clothing and removed my clothes and placed them on the nearby rocks prior to entering the pool. I simply returned to the car in my bathing suit and placed my clothes on the back seat prior to departing from Hellulaug.

If you absolutely must use a facility, Hótel Flókalundur is nearby approximately 500 yards away; and the personnel employed there might grant your request to use a toilet if necessary.

I realize that a remote pool with hot water which is fed by a natural spring is not for everyone — some people would prefer the Blue Lagoon — but I must admit that the water temperature was perfect for me; and I did not want to leave the pool, as I could have stayed in it for hours. For me, the experience was so peaceful, quiet and relaxing.

I highly recommend visiting this pool if you plan to be in the Westfjords region of Iceland; and I personally am glad that I chose this experience over the Blue Lagoon any day.

All photographs ©2018 by Brian Cohen.

6 thoughts on “Instead of Blue Lagoon in Iceland, I Went to…”

  1. Is skinny dipping permitted? (Yes, I live in California, which has lot of hot springs, and where sinny dipping is common.)

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      That is a very good question to which I did not know the answer, Gary Steiger – FreeFrequentFlyerMiles.com — but I would say yes, based on the information in this article…

      https://guidetoiceland.is/history-culture/getting-naked-in-iceland

      …and no, I did not try it out for myself…

  2. lenin1991 says:

    Based on the third photo…it seems like you may have been interrupting something…

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      I was leaving at the time that that photograph was taken, lenin1991; so I would not be the least bit surprised if…well…you know…

  3. rmah says:

    never been to iceland. you’re making me want that never to be a double negative.

    you only need a comma here :

    “I was not fortunate enough on this particular day~~~~;~~~~ but I understand that one can view many species of birds at this location.”

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      The article has since been edited.

      Thank you again as always, rmah!

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