Skip This Hotel Liquidation Sale. Here is Why…

On my way back from the Atlanta A80 Terminal Radar Approach Control Facility in Peachtree City, I stopped by what used to be known as the Atlanta Sheraton Airport, which officially closed on Sunday, July 23, 2017 because the hotel property was acquired by the city of Atlanta for $16.8 million and destined for eventual demolition as part of the $6 billion expansion plan for the international airport which serves the greater Atlanta metropolitan area.

The expansion plan includes the extension of at least one terminal and the possible addition of a sixth runway for the airport.

Skip This Hotel Liquidation Sale. Here is Why…

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The closure of the hotel property at 1900 Sullivan Road meant clearing 395 rooms of furniture, lighting, mirrors, hair dryers, flat-screen televisions and soap dishes — as well as equipment, fixtures and furnishings from the restaurant which was on site, the lobby, meeting rooms, offices and the outside patio…

…and everything was consolidated onto two floors for a liquidation tag sale, which started on Thursday, August 10, 2017 and is scheduled to continue for a total duration of two weeks. All items are being sold by the piece on a basis of first come, first serve by Hotel Content Liquidators LLC

…but are significant savings for the public really being offered? Are there some incredible bargains to be had?

Not exactly.

What Can You Get For Your Money?

One cannot help but notice the name and logo of the former hotel property are covered from view when approaching it — and a large sign warns visitors that the hotel is closed while other signs announce the liquidation sale.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The former shuttle bus does not appear to be for sale — yet, anyway.

Customers who walk in through the lobby of the former hotel property are given a slip of paper to mark down which items they would like to purchase — especially if they are not capable of taking immediate delivery due to their size — and are immediately greeted by furnishings, fixtures and virtually everything else adorned with price tags.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

A guest room door may be priced at $45.00; but if you want the electronic door lock which is attached to it, be prepared to fork over another $55.00. Soap dishes were a dollar apiece, as were amenity trays.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

You can also purchase worn-out chairs and old uniforms.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Catering equipment is for sale — such as plates and chafing dishes…

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…and racks for transporting food.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This armoire — which at one time contained a television and some other items — can be yours for only $599.00.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Speaking of televisions: how about some flat-screen televisions with older technology for $99.00 for a 32-inch screen; or $129.00 for a 37-inch screen?

For comparison purposes — as of the time this article was written — you could purchase a brand new 40-inch flat screen television with at least quadruple the resolution for $249.00; and it will almost certainly weigh significantly less than these models.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Remote controls for the televisions — which have been cited as one of the parts of a hotel room which harbor the most germs — are conveniently stored in bulk in plastic containers which used to be used as trash cans in the rooms. No, there was no plastic bag in the containers. Ensure that your new remote control is throughly sanitized before using it with your new — er…used — television.

Who knows how many people have used these devices prior to this sale?

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

You read that paper sign on the yellow bin correctly: stained towels are for sale — just in case you do not find them often enough while staying are a guest at a hotel or resort property and you want to experience that more often out of sheer nostalgia.

Hand towels cost two dollars each; while bath towels cost four dollars each.

Perhaps you will be lucky and find hair in these towels as well — but there is no word on how much extra you will be charged for that hair.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Comforters, duvets, mattress covers and pillows — priced at $20.00, $15.00, $8.00 and $2.00 respectively — are strewn all over the floor.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

A complete king sized bed costs $225.00.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Some people believe they have seen the light with desk lamps and nightstand lamps priced at $35.00 each — although fluorescent bulbs are no longer the latest in illumination technology.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

One might believe that $45.00 for a floor lamp is kind of shade-y.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This wooden desk is an absolute steal for only $145.00 — especially in its condition. The flat-screen television is not included in the price.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Would you pay $75.00 for these old copying machines?

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I am not sure as to what the prices were for coffee makers and telephones; but I would guess that they are rather phone-y.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

At eight dollars for hair dryers, this sale literally blows. Irons — seen in the background — cost ten dollars.

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

By the way, what you see is not exactly what you get in terms of prices: tack on another ten percent for a “buyer’s premium” and another 7.75 percent in sales tax to your purchases for a total of 17.75 percent in additional costs.

That seems similar to the percentage of tax you would pay for staying in one of the hotel rooms or paying for room service — right?

Summary

This is your chance to acquire some furniture and other items — if you want to recreate and replicate staying in a hotel room in 1997 for prices which are not exactly bargain basement.

Of course, prices will be reduced on unsold items as the sale progresses — but I would not take many of the items I saw if they were given to me for free…

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…and yet, items were being sold — such as this sign which once identified the restaurant within the building…

Liquidation Sale Sheraton Atlanta Airport hotel

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…as well as some of the equipment inside of the former restaurant.

The building itself was rather dark and dreary inside. It will eventually be put out of its misery when it is demolished.

At least the parking is finally free of charge at this former hotel property…

…but is a “buyer’s premium” another deceptive way of advertising prices — similar to mandatory resort fees and carrier-imposed surcharges?

All photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

6 thoughts on “Skip This Hotel Liquidation Sale. Here is Why…”

  1. James says:

    What is ‘buyer premium’?

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      It is supposed to be a percentage added to the winning bid of an auction which is paid by the purchaser to cover administrative expenses, James

      …but as I said, in this case — because this is not an auction; but rather, a liquidation tag sale — it is simply an added fee which is similar to mandatory resort fees and carrier-imposed surcharges.

      I would prefer that they simply include the “buyer’s premium” in the price of an item and just take ten percent from the proceeds — even if that means increasing the prices by ten percent to cover the “premium.” This way, purchasers immediately know the price of items for sale up front and can compare them to similar items which can be purchased new…

  2. Mike L says:

    What a bunch of overpriced crap. I went to the Riviera Las Vegas liquidation sale when they had something like this and it was just as disappointing. They probably won’t be able to give away hotel pillows, much less sell them.

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      I thought to myself, “Why would I pay two dollars for a pillow on which hundreds of people slept?”

      As for your experience, Mike L, that liquidation sale was most likely operated by the same entity mentioned in the article; so I would expect the experience to be similar…

      …and yet, people were buying. Go figure…

  3. James says:

    Thanks Brian. I guess some people just too greedy for selling or there’s another purpose. Perhaps so that nobody buys and the (former) employee can take it for free?

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      That is a good question, James — and I do not immediately know the answer as to whether the liquidation tag sale benefits Sheraton or the city of Atlanta — or perhaps both entities…

      …and in my opinion, many of the items were so “ratty” that I would not take them myself for free…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *