Someone Was Shot in a Hotel. Do You Get Compensation For Its Lockdown?

“Last night at the Ann Arbor, Michigan Holiday Inn, there was a 3 a.m. shooting injuring a man. Metro SWAT surrounded and entered the hotel, then woke everyone up. Guests were forced to leave their rooms for a few hours to be locked-down in a hotel conference room. No one could leave the hotel. During the lock-down, Holiday Inn provided complimentary coffee and orange juice as it was too early for their scheduled hotel breakfast service. Since this hotel shooting was not the fault of Holiday Inn, should guests staying overnight be billed the full price for their room or should guests receive some extra IHG points for their inconvenience?”

Someone Was Shot in a Hotel. Do You Get Compensation For Its Lockdown?

The incident to which FlyerTalk member ceieoc was referring occurred at approximately 2:50 in the morning on Friday, March 30, 2018 at the Holiday Inn Ann Arbor Near the University of Michigan hotel property where a man was injured by a gunshot wound — but his injuries are not believed to threaten his life; and the incident remains under investigation.

“The hotel went into lockdown about 4 a.m. and guests were escorted to a banquet room, so police could search the building,” according to this article written by Darcie Moran for MLive. “Guests were allowed to return to their rooms about 6:45 a.m.” Management at the hotel property reportedly accommodated guests and ensured that they were as comfortable as possible.

Summary

Need I really comment as to what I believe is the answer to the question of whether guests who were inconvenienced should receive compensation as a result of the lockdown of a hotel caused by someone being shot?

I think I will let the majority of FlyerTalk members who commented in this discussion answer that question instead — and let’s just say that I stared at the title of that discussion for a moment to realize whether or not I read it correctly…

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.


 

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13 thoughts on “Someone Was Shot in a Hotel. Do You Get Compensation For Its Lockdown?”

  1. James says:

    Locking guests in a conference room for 3 hours is insane. Sounds like something Saudi Arabia would do. I would not pay for the night and demand further compensation. The hotel could deal with the city to get paid for their losses. Imagine a shooting at the house across the street from your house and they haul everyone on your street out of their homes in the middle of the night and detain them at the club house or if you live in an apartment and they drag every one out of the building. Totally unacceptable by the police and the hotel to allow it to happen.

  2. Left Handed Passenger says:

    I don’t think you use readers when you inject your personality or commentary to a link-sourced story. In fact, I think more readers would like to see your analysis and commentary to any link-sourced story you post as a blog.

    I do hope you lose readers for posting uncommented stories, copy & paste of announcements, and clickbait.

    If you think that’s too much infotaiment, I don’t think so. I expect some effort on your part, on top of story-gathering.

    1. Peter says:

      Ditto. I can’t believe this was a full post on boardingarea.

  3. Sandy says:

    I stayed in a Sheraton in Bakersfield that went on lockdown because of a police standoff that turned into a shootout in the parking lot. We were not allowed to leave our rooms for about four hours iirc (incident occurred in 2013). No one that I know of received compensation. I was top tier status with chain at the time. Hard to draw a line between safety and inconvenience sometimes. Personally, I would rather be subject to a lockdown than potentially have another shooter at large or see a guest hit by a bullet when the standoff turned into a shootout. It was terrifying especially after the suspects and police started shooting at each other, but in no way the hotel’s fault. They acted correctly to protect their guests.

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      I completely agree with you, Sandy — and I am glad that despite being terrified, you emerged from that incident safely.

  4. Dylan says:

    I’m surprised no one asked the question of what would happen if being detained caused the passenger to miss an early morning flight. Most airlines CoC would cover such a scenario with proof and put you on the next available flight, but what if the next flight option wasn’t for another day or two. In that case I would expect the hotel to accommodate me until I was able to depart. I wouldn’t call that compensation so much as duty of care due to the situation.

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      I did not ask the question because I did not even think about it, Dylan.

      What an interesting scenario you posit…

  5. TopCat says:

    Sorry for my brusqueness but where is any evidence that the hotel could possible foresee this incident occurring and why should the hotel compensate anyone for following police orders.

    Must someone always have their hand out and scheme for compensation from those not at fault?

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      That was the point of the article, TopCat

      …and there is no need to apologize for your brusqueness. In fact, it is welcomed here.

    2. gawa says:

      This is a great example of two things:

      1. Some blog posting a story without all the details.
      2. Random people commenting without all the details.

      I was a guest there that night and notified the hotel TWICE of illegal activity in that room 1 hour before and again 30 minutes before the shooting.

      When we didn’t see the hotel take any action, we requested to change floors entirely. Thankfully we did so when we did – the shooting took place just after we got settled just as we were discussing calling the police.

      We very easily could have been caught between the shooters and their only exit in the stairwell. The hotel neglected to act on our reports of illegal activities and in doing so allowed the scene to be set for this kind of an outcome.

  6. Peter says:

    It’s real intriguing that the vast majority of FT users are against seeking compensation, considering that the forum is so heavily biased toward people who churn credit cards, manufacture spend, fly mistake fares, and otherwise maximize promotions.

    I get the argument that guests “should just be thankful that they are alive”. Such is the sad but true mental state of living in the United States! But that argument fails when the circumstances change by just a little bit. Let’s say the shooting happened at 9pm and guests scheduled to arrive then would not be able to check in at all and end up sleeping elsewhere. Should the hotel still bill those guests and earn its expected revenue for the night? It’s also not inconceivable for the lock-down to extend longer, keeping all guests away from their rooms for the entire duration of their stay. Still not the hotel’s fault, but do rooms with no actual availability deserve to cost their nightly rates? So if the hotel would own up to either of these situations, how would it not be liable for the 3-4 hour “inconvenience”?

    1. gawa says:

      Thank you!!

      I was a guest there that night and notified the hotel TWICE of illegal activity in that room 1 hour before and again 30 minutes before the shooting.

      When we didn’t see the hotel take any action, we requested to change floors entirely. Thankfully we did so when we did – the shooting took place just after we got settled just as we were discussing calling the police.

      We very easily could have been caught between the shooters and their only exit in the stairwell. The hotel neglected to act on our reports of illegal activities and in doing so allowed the scene to be set for this kind of an outcome.

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