Texas sign
Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Texas to Secede From the United States as a Separate Nation?

Here we go again.

Imagine that you have an upcoming business trip to Texas. You might be required to carry your passport along with you when you pass through border control and immigration…

…and imagine if that scenario actually became a reality.

Texas to Secede From the United States as a Separate Nation?

Texas became a part of Mexico after gaining its independence from Spain in 1821. After formally declaring its independence with the Texas Declaration of Independence on Wednesday, March 2, 1836, Texas was an independent republic before joining the United States as state number 28 on Monday, December 29, 1845 until it voted to secede in from the Union on Friday, February 1, 1861. As many as 750,000 people in the Civil War — which was greater than two percent of the entire population of the United States at that time — died. Texas was formally readmitted to the Union on Wednesday, March 30, 1870 during the Reconstruction Era following the defeat of the Confederacy in 1865….

…and if members of the Republican Party in the state have their way, Texas would become an independent republic once again, as a resolution was adopted at the Texas State Republican Convention in urging the Legislature of Texas to propose a referendum before the people of Texas in November of 2023 “to determine whether or not the State of Texas should reassert its status as an independent nation.”

Kyle Biedermann and James White — both of whom are members of the House of Representatives of the state of Texas who represent District 73 and District 19 respectively; and are both members of the Republican Party — authored and introduced Bill HB 1359 to the Legislature of Texas last year, “Relating to proposing a referendum to the people of the State of Texas on the question of whether this state should leave the United States of America and establish an independent republic.” The bill had apparently stalled.

Final Boarding Call

Although it can possibly happen if all of the hurdles are cleared, Texas becoming a sovereign nation is technically not legal in accordance with the terms of the Constitution of the United States — no state has seceded from the Union since Texas did — but it is the latest of a series of geographic areas in the United States which have considered secession.

In addition to seven counties seeking to leave Oregon and become part of the state of Idaho, there apparently has been a race as to which region, district or territory will become the next state of the United States first — the District of Columbia becoming Washington Douglass Commonwealth; the proposed state of Cascadia, the proposed state of Jefferson; or the commonwealth of Puerto Rico, where 61 percent of its citizens voted in a referendum in support of the financially-strapped island to become a state in 2012…

…and those are only four of a number of possible candidates for statehood.

The United States has been divided on a number of issues in recent years; and while the possibility of its boundaries and borders being altered might have been shrugged off years ago as a stunt of sorts, there may be an increased chance of that happening — although the processes of secession or statehood is difficult enough that it is not probable for all intents and purposes.

Are you eventually going to need a passport to visit Texas? Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

    1. The answer to your question is simple, SMR.

      The creation or maintenance of geographic boundaries — which certainly have a lot to do with travel — are usually political in nature; and a possible change in those boundaries could potentially mean a change in travel.

    2. Need I remind SMR that Texas still has International Boundary Markers that have never been formally removed. Since Washington DC’s mayor has been flying 51-star flags, the Texas plan to help the nation by removing the need for any new official flags, flag patches, repainting aircraft and etc. makes economic sense and would save us taxpayers billions of dollars. God Bless Texas for trying to help the American taxpayers!

  1. “Texas becoming a sovereign nation is technically not possible.”

    That’s what the Serbians said about Bosnia and Kosovo, China says about Xinjiang, Tibet, and Taiwan, and Iraq says about Kurdistan. But people in Texas – not to mention Puerto Rico – are no less entitled to self-determination than any of these places.

    1. I do not disagree with you, Mak

      …but please note the word technically — meaning that Texas seceding from the United States is indeed possible but not probable.

      1. But you wrote that it’s “technically not possible.” Which is it, technically possible or not possible?

        1. I gave a lot of thought to what you and other readers of The Gate commented, 02nz; and I changed that paragraph from…

          “Texas becoming a sovereign nation is technically not possible; but it is the latest of a series of geographic areas in the United States which have considered secession.”

          …to…

          “Although it can possibly happen if all of the hurdles are cleared, Texas becoming a sovereign nation is technically not legal in accordance with the terms of the Constitution of the United States — no state has seceded from the Union since Texas did — but it is the latest of a series of geographic areas in the United States which have considered secession.”

          I hope that what I rewrote was clearer and more to the point.

          Thank you and everyone else who brought this to my attention…

          1. The colonists declaring independence from the King was also not legal according to the King. It was legal according to the colonists. The colonists won out. To say Texas becoming a sovereign nation is not technically possible is an illogical statement. It definitely is possible.

            1. I have since corrected that part of the article, John Bard

              …and I do not disagree with you.

  2. I too am interested in the supporting authority behind your assertion that secession is “not possible” for Texas. Perhaps it would be more accurate to say it is highly improbable?

      1. You are talking about constitutional. Throughout the last 6000 years, many sovereign nations have been formed and ended despite what the prior constitution in each said. Kosovo in the last 15 years is a good example of that and we will see with parts of Ukraine. Cuba certainly comes to mind.

        1. You are correct, John Bard — but no state has been successful in seceding from the United States since Texas was the last state to have done so.

  3. It would be wonderful to be an independent again. We Texans would also help Americans by enforcing Texas’s border with Mexico.

  4. 100 million people in Texas and 15-20 other States who don’t consent to the current system and don’t support the current system leaving and declaring independence is the rational thing to do. If one group holds another, it is called slavery. 100 million people being enslaved by 200 million people is the definition of democracy. If it is majority rule, there is no freedom. Self determination and consent of the governed are well known principles.

    Secession isn’t even necessary if those 100 million realized the words of politicians and judges 1500 miles away mean nothing if they can’t be enforced. 100 million is the biggest police force in the Western Hemisphere. Secession isn’t necessary. Leadership is.

  5. That would be great for all the brain dead in USA would have a refuge. Sadly it would not happen and legally is not possible

  6. There are a number of areas in the current United States that have pushed for this but also within states as well. For example in Illinois over 20 counties (and counting) have already voted to secede or separate from the state, leaving Cook County behind. RE: https://illinoisnewsroom.org/23-counties-and-counting-downstate-separation-referendum-wins-favor-in-november-election/

    It might be too late for Texas as they are already becoming infiltrated by liberal Democrats fleeing states like California. This in turn is changing the culture and voting block in Texas. It’s only a matter of time before Texas has higher taxes and more liberal policies like California or other liberal states.

    I think there are a lot of things that we would have said is impossible 20 years ago that are happening today so it may be a matter of time. Our country has entered a hedonist stage of civilization which is never a good sign.

  7. “Texas becoming a sovereign nation is technically not possible”

    On what planet is this true?

    The BEST thing for the US, would be a national divorce.
    Let all the liberals live in utopia. Let conservatives live how they want.

    I am 1000% for Texas succession, and any and all states breaking off.
    It’s the only way forward to a better future.

    1. You must have read an older version of the article, Don, as that paragraph had been changed.

      That paragraph is now “Although it can possibly happen if all of the hurdles are cleared, Texas becoming a sovereign nation is technically not legal in accordance with the terms of the Constitution of the United States — no state has seceded from the Union since Texas did — but it is the latest of a series of geographic areas in the United States which have considered secession.”

  8. Brian – You forgot that momentum is gathering for a Convention of States. Everything is up for grabs once the Convention takes place. Heck, tarring and feathering Washington politicians may legally change from a hate crime to a sacred public duty!

  9. Sounds good to me.

    GOP would lose 38 electoral votes, net loss seats in the house and 2 senate seats. Texas would stop getting Medicaid, federal funding whatsoever, and couldn’t use the dollar anymore.

    Yes, please, go!

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