Travel Alert August 2020: Tropical Storm Isaias to Impact the East Coast of the United States

If the east coast of the United States is in your travel plans over the next few days, you may want to consider delaying your travel — or, at least, keep yourself updated as to the latest information pertaining to the weather — due to Tropical Storm Isaias, of which landfall is likely, as the eye is forecast to pass over the coast near the border of South Carolina and North Carolina as soon as later tonight, Monday, August 3, 2020.

Travel Alert August 2020: Tropical Storm Isaias to Impact the East Coast of the United States

Hurricane Isaias

Source: National Hurricane Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the United States.

Maximum sustained winds of this storm — which is currently centered approximately 220 miles south southwest of Myrtle Beach and is moving north at 13 miles per hour — are 70 miles per hour, which means that this storm is almost a minimal Category 1 hurricane and could strengthen again to become a hurricane one more time prior to landfall…

…but in addition to weakening, this storm has contracted in size; which means that it will affect less of an area than first thought — but the areas which will be impacted may likely experience flash flooding from up to ten inches of heavy rain, locally damaging winds with gusts up to as strong as 80 miles per hour at times, rough surf, a storm surge of up to six feet, and electric power outages.

Once landfall occurs, Tropical Storm Isaias is not expected to return to open water again as it tracks along the east coast of the United States and eventually weakens to a tropical depression later this week.

A hurricane warning has been issued for a portion of the coasts of northeastern South Carolina and southeastern North Carolina — which includes Myrtle Beach and Wilmington — as the storm may strengthen to a minimal Category 1 hurricane tonight.

Tropical storm warnings extend as far north as the border of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, which include cities such as Savannah, Raleigh, Richmond, Norfolk, the District of Columbia, Virginia Beach, Wilmington, Dover, Philadelphia, Atlantic City, Newark, New York, Hartford, New Haven, Providence, Worcester, and Boston. Tropical storm watches extend as far north as the border between northern Maine and western New Brunswick.

Interestingly, Wilmington refers to the jurisdictions in North Carolina, Delaware, and Massachusetts, as all of them are covered under the tropical storm warning.

Thankfully, the state of Florida was spared much of the wrath of when this storm was a hurricane this past weekend.

Flight Waivers, Delays and Cancellations

If you are traveling to or from the east coast of the United States over the next few days, expect delays and cancellations of flights. Keep up to date on the latest information pertaining to this tropical weather system which may adversely affect your travel plans. Better yet, postponing or canceling your trip might be a better option — no matter which mode of travel you plan on taking.

If you have a flight scheduled, your flight may be delayed or canceled — and you may be eligible for a waiver of a fee to change your itinerary.

Here are three airlines which have issued travel alerts — or are at least monitoring the storm — as a result of this tropical weather system:

  • American Airlines has issued travel alerts for seven cities in three states for Monday, August 3, 2020 through Tuesday, August 4, 2020; and Friday, August 7, 2020 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.
  • Delta Air Lines has issued travel alerts for seven cities in three states for Monday, August 3, 2020 through Tuesday, August 4, 2020; and Friday, August 7, 2020 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.
  • Southwest Airlines has issued a travel alerts for Charleston for Monday, August 3, 2020 through Tuesday, August 4, 2020; and Tuesday, August 18, 2020 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.

Summary

Be sure to contact your airline or transportation provider for the latest information pertaining to your travels — if they are adversely affected — and please: travel safely.

Source: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Department of Commerce of the United States.

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