Update: Travel Alert Dates Extended by Airlines For Harvey

Tropical Storm Harvey — which was once a Category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds at 130 miles per hour and has since been historic and unprecedented in numerous ways — is currently back out over the Gulf of Mexico; and landfall is expected to occur in Louisiana later this week as it meanders and continues to drench southeastern Texas and southern Louisiana with heavy rains.

Update: Travel Alert Dates Extended by Airlines For Harvey

Tropical Storm Harvey

Tropical Storm Harvey is back over the western Gulf of Mexico and is meandering towards the coastline of the state of Louisiana, which is outlined with purple lines. Source: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Department of Commerce of the United States.

Although this storm is expected to strengthen while it is over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico — it is located approximately 80 miles south southwest of Port Arthur in Texas, with maximum sustained winds currently at 45 miles per hour — it is not predicted to become a hurricane once again…

…but it is expected to spread its significant precipitation as it tracks north northeast at eight miles per hour — and that moisture is expected to be widespread where potentially up to ten additional inches of rain could fall. In addition to Houston, cities which may experience flooding include Shreveport, Gulfport, Memphis, New Orleans, Little Rock, Jackson, Baton Rouge and Biloxi…

…but other areas of the southeastern United States may also experience significant rainfall. For example, the forecast for Atlanta is to receive up to four inches of precipitation by the end of the week — and it is not even located in the projected track of Harvey.

Bands of rain from Harvey are spreading further north and east — affecting areas as far away as Tampa, Mobile, Pensacola, Montgomery and Orlando. Expect cities such as Louisville, Birmingham, Nashville and Knoxville to eventually receive significant rainfall over the course of this week.

In addition to damaging winds, disruptions in power, dangerous surf, beach erosion, isolated tornadoes, and a storm surge of up to three feet in some locations, the main event is still expected to be disastrous widespread flooding from as much as 50 inches of heavy rain by the time all is said and done. Mary’s Creek — which is located southeast of Houston — reported already having received a record 49.32 inches of rain before the rain gauge finally failed

…and to further exacerbate the situation, at least one levee breach is being reported at Columbia Lakes along the Brazos River in Brazoria County in Texas, where residents are urged to evacuate as soon as possible with the blunt message of “GET OUT NOW!!”

Two major reservoirs are currently uncontrollably overflowing.

In addition to the obvious disaster which southeastern Texas and southern Louisiana is currently experiencing, I am somewhat concerned that the track of Harvey will eventually be headed towards areas within eight states which are currently being inundated by the storm which has yet to be called Irma — from the extreme northeast corner of North Carolina to extreme southwestern Connecticut. Although the storms are expected to occur in these areas approximately one week apart, the combined precipitation from both storms may lead to significant flooding in some locations. Cities such as Baltimore, New York, Philadelphia, Roanoke, Newport News, Virginia Beach and the District of Columbia are located in these areas; so if you are traveling to or from them within the next couple of weeks, ensure that you keep yourself updated with the latest information.

Flight Waivers, Delays and Cancellations

If you are traveling to anywhere in the region of the Texas and Louisiana coasts of the Gulf of Mexico — as well as much of the southeastern United States — over the next week or so, expect additional delays and cancellations of flights. Keep up to date on the latest information pertaining to this winter weather system which may adversely affect your travel plans. Better yet, postponing or canceling your trip might be a better option — no matter which mode of travel you plan on taking.

If you have a flight scheduled, your flight may be delayed or canceled — and you may be eligible for a waiver of a fee to change your itinerary. If you are driving in any of these areas, watch out for deteriorating weather conditions and traffic problems.

Both airports which serve the greater Houston metropolitan area are still not fully operating until further notice, according to this official statement — which contains the following text that was copied verbatim — released from Houston Airport System:

Over the next few days, severe weather caused by Hurricane Harvey may impact flights at IAH and HOU. The Houston Airports advises passengers to stay in touch with their air carriers for the most accurate information regarding specific flight status.

UPDATED 8/29/2017 at 8:30 a.m.
Commercial operations have ceased at both IAH and HOU until further notice due to severe weather. No inbound or outbound flights from either airport at this time. For flight details, rescheduling and waivers, please contact your air carrier.

Here are nine airlines which have issued travel alerts as a result of this tropical weather system — most of them which have been updated since the last article pertaining to Hurricane Harvey posted at The Gate:

  • Delta Air Lines has issued a travel alert for four airports in Texas and five airports in Louisiana for Friday, August 25, 2017 through Thursday, September 7, 2017; and Wednesday, September 20, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.
  • American Airlines has issued travel alerts for ten airports in Texas and six airports in Louisiana for Monday, August 28, 2017 through Thursday, September 7, 2017; and Wednesday, September 20, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.
  • United Airlines has issued travel alerts for nine airports in Texas and five airports in Louisiana for Friday, August 25, 2017 through Tuesday, September 5, 2017; and Wednesday, September 20, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.
  • Alaska Airlines has issued travel alerts for three airports in Texas for Thursday, August 24, 2017 through Sunday, September 3, 2017; and Wednesday, August 30, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must be completed.
  • JetBlue Airways has issued a travel alert for Houston for Sunday, August 27, 2017 through Tuesday, September 5, 2017; and Friday, September 15, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.
  • Southwest Airlines has issued travel alerts for six airports in Texas for Thursday, August 24, 2017 through Tuesday, September 5, 2017; and Tuesday, September 19, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.
  • Spirit Airlines has issued a travel alert for Houston and New Orleans for Tuesday, August 29, 2017 through Tuesday, September 5, 2017; and Wednesday, September 20, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must begin.
  • Frontier Airlines has issued travel alerts for three airports in Texas: for Houston, Sunday, August 27, 2017 through Tuesday, September 5, 2017; and Sunday, October 15, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must be completed — while for Austin and San Antonio, Sunday, August 27, 2017 and Thursday, August 31, 2017; and Monday, September 30, 2017 is the last day on which tickets must be reissued and rebooked travel must be completed.
  • WestJet Airways has issued a travel alert for one airport in Texas for Thursday, August 24, 2017 through Friday, September 1, 2017.

Summary

Be sure to contact your airline or transportation provider for the latest information pertaining to your travels — if they are adversely affected — and please: travel safely and carefully, as Hurricane Harvey is considered to be life-threatening.

Please also keep the people of southeastern Texas in your thoughts and prayers, as at least eight fatalities have already occurred as a result of this storm — and tens of thousands of displaced people remain homeless; while hundreds of thousands are expected to be in need of disaster assistance. They will need all of the help that they can get…

…and here is how you can help — and perhaps earn some miles in the process:

Source: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Department of Commerce of the United States.

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