A Quiet Moment at Silverton Falls in Banff National Park

U pon leaving Johnston Canyon — of which I will post one last article with photographs in addition to this article of the lower falls and this article of the upper falls — I then drove northwest almost seven kilometers on Bow Valley Parkway past Castle Mountain to the trailhead for Rockbound Lake to visit Silverton Falls in Banff National Park.

A Quiet Moment at Silverton Falls in Banff National Park

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

After parking the car in the parking lot for Rockbound Lake…

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…I then hiked approximately three-quarters of a kilometer towards Silverton Falls. I did not go to Tower Lake or Rockbound Lake.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The trail starts out flat at first and passes some rapids in Silverton Creek in the woods.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The hike is quite easy — and peaceful — at this point…

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…but then, the trail noticeably narrows as it ascends.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The ground becomes rougher as it is pebbled with small rocks; and sharp turns are more prevalent as the grade increases.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Be careful not to trip on the roots embedded in the trail…

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…or lose your footing over the large boulders — for as you can see, one wrong move might mean a nasty tumble down the slope on the right.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Eventually, the trail approaches an area which resembles what appears to be the result of a miniature avalanche…

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…but the view of the mountains from this point is breathtaking.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This view is looking back on the trail after just passing the miniature avalanche area, on which caution is advised not to slip on the loose rocks and dirt on the edge of that steep slope.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The ground becomes more stable once again as the trail further ascends away from the miniature avalanche area…

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…affording more views…

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…including those of the mountains — and by this time, I hear the faint roar of Silverton Falls.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I finally arrived at Silverton Falls.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Silverton Falls is approximately 50 meters in height — and it is loud, as the sound of the rushing waters echoes off of the rock walls.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

A nearby mining town called Silverton — which was the namesake for the falls — has not existed since it disappeared in 1883.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The waters of Silverton Creek rush past in a narrow channel in the rock…

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…and past this cave-like feature in the rock wall.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The photograph shown above is of Silverton Creek beyond the bottom of the falls.

Silverton Falls

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I look back one more time at the top of Silverton Falls and simply daydream for a few minutes to the only sound of the roar of cascading water.

Summary

Hiking the trail to Silverton Falls is not difficult for anyone who is typically healthy, in my opinion — but I would not recommend it to anyone who has been diagnosed with acrophobia; to anyone who cannot stand a little exertion; to anyone who is considered disabled; and to anyone who is not steady on his or her feet.

There is no admission cost to visit Silverton Falls; and you can stay as long as you like. I probably saw four people at the most during my time there; and I understand that it is a welcome respite from the hordes of crowds which normally clog Johnston Canyon nearby during the summer months.

I recommend visiting Silverton Falls — especially if you need some privacy outdoors in the Canadian wilderness.

All photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

One thought on “A Quiet Moment at Silverton Falls in Banff National Park”

  1. iv says:

    Loving your pics of Canada.

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