Delta Flight Museum: Photographs Inside Hangar 2 of the Official Venue of the 2015 Freddie Awards

nce entering the vestibule of the Delta Flight Museum at its main entrance, you are greeted by an engine built by Rolls Royce.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The clear barrier in front of the engine — with a base of actual wheels flat on the floor — is for your protection, as the interior of the engine actually turns. Note the model airplanes hanging from the ceiling. To the left and not shown in the photograph is one of the entrances to the museum store.

This is the entrance to the museum store from Hangar 2. The exit to the vestibule by the main entrance from the museum store is inside on the left; or you can exit directly from Hangar 2, whose egress is off to the left outside of the photograph. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

This is the entrance to the museum store from Hangar 2. The exit to the vestibule by the main entrance from the museum store is inside on the left; or you can exit directly from Hangar 2, whose egress is off to the left outside of the photograph. The Delta Air Lines sign above the museum store is from the old Terminal 3 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, which has since been razed. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The entrance to the Delta Flight Museum from either the vestibule or the museum store takes you into Hangar 2, which includes The Spirit of Delta Boeing 767-232 aircraft.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

If you have flown as a passenger out of Terminal 3 — also known as the Worldport — at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, you will recognize the Delta Air Lines signage above the entrance to the museum store.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

There are a number of exhibits located in Hangar 2 in addition to The Spirit of Delta aircraft. A train of baggage carts are smartly repurposed as display cases of memorabilia.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

There are two flight simulators: the blue Link Trainer flight simulator — circa 1940s — which helped to train greater than a half million pilots during and after World War II…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…but it is dwarfed by the Boeing 737-200 flight simulator, which is available for anyone who wants to experience what it is like to fly a commercial airplane.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The Boeing 737-200 flight simulator is on the left, partially obscured by a wing of The Spirit of Delta aircraft; while on the right is the platform for access to the flight simulator. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

The fee for one hour of “flight time” is $425.00 — which includes tax; and up to four people can participate.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

You will receive a pre-flight briefing of ten minutes; 45 minutes of “flight time”; and a five-minute review at the end of your experience. Click here for details on how to reserve time in the flight simulator for yourself.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

You get a nice view of The Spirit of Delta aircraft from the platform on which the Boeing 737-200 flight simulator rests. Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Equally interesting as the exhibits were to me was the architecture of the historic hangar — such as the old bricks which have since been coated with white paint…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…as well as the network of beams and trusses of which the ceiling is supported and comprised.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

They have since been painted over as well.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

One of the challenges of the renovation of what was once the Delta Heritage Museum was the literally hundreds of old panes of glass in the windows and massive doors of the hangar which either needed to be restored…

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

…or covered up altogether.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

An actual prototype of a Lockheed L-1011-1 currently on permanent display in Hangar 2 was once used as the museum store in Hangar 1 of the former Delta Heritage Museum. The current museum store is significantly larger with more room around which to walk.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Its first flight occurred on November 16, 1970; and it was only used for test flights, as it was never actually flown commercially by an airline.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Once used for films such as Passenger 57 and Quick Change, the inside of the former aircraft can now be used as a conference room; or for other purposes.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

This would be a cool place to have a meeting.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Remember this old relic — and how expensive it was to use it?

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

In case you were wondering, yes — the overhead bins inside of the prototype Lockheed L-1011-1 are still functional; and they are empty.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

I intend to post photographs of Hangar 1 as well as additional photographs of Hangar 2 in a future article.

To be continued…

All photographs ©2014 by Brian Cohen.

3 thoughts on “Delta Flight Museum: Photographs Inside Hangar 2 of the Official Venue of the 2015 Freddie Awards”

  1. Steve Case says:

    Great photos, thanks for sharing

  2. TOM N. says:

    I did fly commercially on an L-1011 from DEN to JFK on TWA back in the mid-70’s.

    1. Brian Cohen says:

      I am sure I have flown as a passenger on Lockheed L-1011 airplanes operated by Trans World Airlines as well, TOM N.; and I have definitely flown as a passenger on Lockheed L-1011 airplanes operated by Delta Air Lines numerous times.

      The prototype of the Lockheed L-1011 airplane currently residing in the Delta Flight Museum had never been flown for commercial flights.

      During the Freddie Awards, I met with a friend who adamantly collects memorabilia from Trans World Airlines; and he has quite a collection! Another friend of mine who was there flew on a Lockheed Constellation aircraft operated by Trans World Airlines; and he had purchased a model of that aircraft with the TWA livery on it at a recent air memorabilia show at what was the Delta Heritage Museum.

      I do not believe I have ever flown as a passenger on a Constellation airplane. I suppose that was before my time…

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