Great Sphinx of Giza in Egypt: A Photographic Essay

he is a lady in waiting — waiting, that is, in the same spot for greater than 4,500 years.

The Great Sphinx of Giza — also known simply as the Sphinx, although there are many other sphinxes in Egypt — is the largest monolith statue in the world created out of limestone.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

As the oldest known monumental sculpture, she sits, seemingly guarding the famous Pyramids of Giza behind her.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

There are still many questions to be answered pertaining to this mysterious work of the ancient Egyptians. Why was it erected? By whom exactly was it built?

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

We may never know the answer to the myriad questions which surround what is arguably one of the most famous and recognized historic landmarks in the world; but we can certainly admire it — as well as all of the work which went into it.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

The following photograph shows the walkway from the entrance to the Great Sphinx of Giza from the parking lot.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

I have read by numerous accounts posted in various places on the Internet that the Great Sphinx of Giza is staring at a Pizza Hut.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Actually, she is staring at a restaurant which combines a Pizza Hut and a Kentucky Fried Chicken.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

I cannot imagine that the Great Sphinx of Giza is happy to be viewing the urban sprawl inching towards her over the years.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

I could swear I saw the tracks of stone tears coming out of her eyes as a result of that sad site — especially as her nose was already broken at some point over the millennia.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

The following photograph shows a close view of her right rear “foot” or “paw”…

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

…and the structure — similar to a “penalty box” of some sort in hockey — immediately behind her front “foot” or “paw” on her right side.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Hide the children — here is a close-up view of her rear end. Salacious!

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

…and here she is from afar.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

I hope that you enjoy the rest of the photographs.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

Photograph ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

You can stay as long as you like to admire the Great Sphinx of Giza — even into the night to view a sound and light show — along with the pyramids in the background. I left long before sunset to navigate the rental car through the living nightmare known as the outer Ring Road and I did not want to experience that at night. Additionally, I was departing for the long drive to Hurghada — a resort city by the Red Sea — the next morning.

The cost of admission to see both the Pyramids of Giza and the Great Sphinx of Giza is 80 Egyptian pounds per person — or approximately $10.35. If you are a student, you are eligible to pay 40 Egyptian pounds — or approximately $5.18.

I intend to post an article of photographs of the Pyramids of Giza in a future article; but let me just say this: do not miss viewing both the Great Sphinx of Giza and the pyramids — they are both included as part of the same admission fee — if you find yourself in the Cairo metropolitan area.

All photographs ©2015 by Brian Cohen.

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