The Best View From a Room I Have Ever Seen?

How often do you experience what is arguably one of the best views and one of the worst views from a room which you have ever seen during the same trip?

Well, that phenomenon happened during my recent trip to the Rocky Mountains of Canada, as this hotel room was a candidate for one of the worst views I have ever experienced from a hotel room at any time during my years of travel…

The Best View From a Room I Have Ever Seen?

…but I booked lodging as a customer for the first time using Booking.com during this special promotion through which $40.00 was returned to my credit card account when I spent a minimum of $80.00 on lodging.

I chose to stay at Mount Robson Lodge.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The first time I realized that I was approaching Mount Robson Lodge — that is, other than passing Mount Robson — was when I was driving west on Trans-Canada Highway 16 in British Columbia and saw the signs along the right side of the road.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I turned left from the highway into the driveway…

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…and was greeted by this sign…

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…as well as this old school bus, which was converted into a billboard of sorts. Judging by the flat tire, I do not believe that it has been used in years — much like the other rusting old vehicles which are on this property.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I did not take advantage of the camping or rafting along the Fraser River.

Checking In

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I parked the car and entered this building to check in for the night. An older woman with silver hair warmly greeted me with what I can only call a “country charm” and checked me in with no problem — albeit with the warning that the nearest grocery store is several miles east and that no breakfast is available in the morning.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Once I received the key, I got back into the car and turned right at where the rusting 1930 Ford Model A coupe was located.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I drove down the gravel road to the end, where there was a small area past a Welcome sign at which to park vehicles. The car which I rented and saved hundreds of dollars was the only one there when I parked it.

The Cabin

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Cabin 5 was the cabin to which I was assigned; and it was the closest one to the parking area.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I walked into the cabin. On the left was a bathroom — with plenty of towels and a hook on a door jamb for hanging clothes — and one bedroom; while straight ahead was the kitchenette and main sleeping area with a dining table and three chairs.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The bedroom was barely large enough to fit a full-sized bed; but it was clean and cozy. No complaints here.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Besides, there were two windows in the bedroom — and another hook to hang clothing — but no other furnishings were in this bedroom.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Next to the hangers was a box with a door which initially looked like a medicine cabinet…

Mount Robson Lodge

Photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…but it was a fuse box for the cabin, which also had a broom and a dustpan with long handles hanging on a hook on the wall next to the entrance to the cabin.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The bathroom was basic but more than adequate. A few small bars of soap, some plastic cups, and plenty of towels awaited me. A nightlight — which was plugged into the wall — illuminated when the lights were turned off.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The kitchenette included a range, a sink, cabinets, and a drainer for dishes and other utensils. The hot water heater is that fat cylindrical object under the shelf in the foreground in the photograph on the left.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

One set of cabinets was stocked with pots, a teapot, a pan, dishes, cups, a cutting board, salt and pepper. The key to the cabin is in the photograph on the right.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Another set of cabinets contained a coffee maker, coffee filters, a toaster and assorted silverware.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Initially thinking that underneath the stove was an oven, I opened the door and found a refrigerator, in which I placed bottles of water and other items to keep them chilled.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

In the main room was a queen-sized bed. This is the bed in which I slept — and it was quite comfortable.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

In the same room was a twin-sized bed, which was located next to a window between the kitchenette area and the dining area with the table and three chairs.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Wooden trusses supported the wooden ceiling, which reminded me a little of my stay at Mantenga Lodge in Mbabane, Swaziland.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

From the hardwood floors to the walls to the ceiling, wood permeated the cabin.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The main room had a door which led outside; so I stepped out and found a picnic table and a bench on the porch…

The Views

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…which led to the first glimpse of the view of Mount Robson just after 9:00 in the evening.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

For some serendipitous reason, I woke up just before 6:30 the next morning without the aide of any device.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

After looking out of the window in the main room and seeing this incredible view, I realized that I was meant to go outside in the chilly air and herald the rising of the sun.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The moment was simply beyond breathtaking.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Not another soul was outside with me during that stunning sunrise.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I looked back at the cabin, enshrouded on one side with white birch trees as the color of the sky slowly metamorphosed into a brilliant shade of cerulean…

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…which was only temporarily hindered by the morning mist.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Fraser River and its tributaries shone in all of their glory that peaceful and quiet morning, the air crisp and fresh.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I could hear the water gently flowing as it meandered down the river.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The morning was as close to perfection as I had ever experienced. Simply amazing.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Seen in the above photograph is the view looking off to the side of the cabin facing southeast.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

There was not a bad view to be seen — even with the picnic table and the rusted wheel hub used for campfires.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I look back at the cabin in which I was staying…

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…and enjoyed the simple wonders of being outdoors with nature at its best.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This gravel road heads back towards the small area where the car which I rented was parked — and the Welcome sign reads Happy Trails on the back.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The edge of the area where cars are to be parked was slowly being warmed by the strong sun as it ascended into the sky.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

As viewed from the cabin, majestic Mount Robson looms in the distance.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

One of the very few incredibly minor negative aspects of staying in a cabin at Mount Robson Lodge is that I occasionally heard a tractor trailer truck passing down Trans-Canada Highway 16 — but the wooded area buffered the cabin area from that sound.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Mount Robson is the tallest peak in the Canadian Rocky Mountains; and the most prominent peak in the North American Rocky Mountains.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

This cabin was one of the closest ones to Mount Robson and Fraser River. It appeared to be unoccupied.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

If this is not part of the best view from a room pertaining to lodging which I have ever seen, then I do not know what is the best view — period.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The cabin in which I stayed is the one furthest away in the background — yet the view from that window was incredible.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

All of the other cabins seemed like they were unoccupied. I felt like I had the entire site all to myself.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Facing south away from Mount Robson — which was behind me — the views were still beautiful.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Who needs a luxury suite in some fancy hotel or resort property, anyway?!?

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Give me this any day.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I stayed as long as I could prior to checking out, admiring the vistas and lush greenery.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

I never did enter into or use this building — which was across from the main building where guests check in — but it appears to be a dining hall of some type.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The satellite dishes and the plastic chairs otherwise distract from the image of this building — which contains the office where guests check in and check out — from truly looking like the wild west.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

After I checked out of my stay with the same woman who checked me in the night before, I then headed on further down the gravel road to the campsites by the Fraser River.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

The views were spectacular…

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

…but the mosquitoes were relentless; so I could not stay to admire the view for long.

Mount Robson Lodge

Photograph ©2017 by Brian Cohen.

Summary

I cannot recommend Mount Robson Lodge highly enough. It was the most peaceful stay I had experienced in a long time; and the natural beauty surrounding this site is beyond words.

If you are searching for opulent luxury with free buffet breakfast while having your elite level status recognized, do not consider staying at Mount Robson Lodge.

I spent $141.91 United States for the night, which was totally well worth the money — that includes all taxes and fees — and it was only sweetened by the $40.00 which was returned to my account by Booking.com only four days after my stay was completed.

In other words, my final total was $101.91 in United States dollars for a rustic cabin which can accommodate up to five people. Thank you, Booking.com!

Mount Robson Lodge is located approximately one hour west of Jasper.

Mount Robson Lodge and Robson Shadows Campground
P.O. Box 157
Valemount, British Columbia
Canada V0E 2Z0
250.566.4821 Telephone
info@mountrobsonlodge.com E-mail address

All photographs ©2017 by Brian Cohen.


 

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2 thoughts on “The Best View From a Room I Have Ever Seen?”

  1. Ralfinho says:

    That is so awesome! Thanks for sharing your experience in words and pictures.
    I haven’t been to Canada for quite a long time (almost a quarter of a century) but there are also quite a lot of scenic places in the US. Which is part of the reasons why I always love traveling to the US (coming from Germany).
    I enjoy my time in cities as well as in nature. And looking at your pictures wakes up memories in me about visiting some fantastic National Parks and staying at a few wonderfully rustic cabins. Or some motel with not so fancy rooms but stellar views (like in the Four Corners Region in the Southwest).
    Thank you!

  2. Jay says:

    Wow! Very nice! Thanks for posting.

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